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"Happiness is the meaning and purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence".

Aristotle said these words more than 2,000 years ago, and they still ring true today. Happiness is a broad term that describes the experience of positive emotions such as joy, contentment, and satisfaction.

Recent research shows that being happier doesn't just make you feel better - it actually comes with a whole host of potential health benefits.

How can being happy make you healthier?

Being happy promotes a number of lifestyle habits that are important for overall health. Happy people tend to eat healthier, with higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

A study of more than 7,000 adults found that those with positive well-being were 47% more likely to consume fresh fruits and vegetables than their less positive counterparts.

Diets rich in fruits and vegetables were consistently linked to a range of health benefits, including lower risk of diabetes, stroke and heart disease.

In the same study of 7,000 adults, researchers found that individuals with positive well-being were 33% more likely to be physically active, with 10 or more hours of physical activity per week.

Regular physical activity helps build strong bones, increase energy levels, reduce body fat, and lower blood pressure.

Healthy sleep

In addition, increased satisfaction can also improve sleep habits, which is important for concentration, productivity, physical performance, and maintaining a healthy weight.

A study of over 700 adults found that sleep problems, including difficulty falling asleep, were 47% higher among those who reported low positive well-being.

Nevertheless, a 2016 review of 44 studies concluded that while there appears to be an association between positive well-being and sleep outcomes, further research from well-designed studies is needed to confirm these findings.

Summary:

Being happy can help promote a healthy lifestyle. Studies show that happier people are more likely to eat healthier and be more physically active.

Ways to increase happiness

Being happy doesn't just make you feel better - it's also incredibly beneficial for your health.Here are 7 scientifically proven ways to be happier.
  1. Express gratitude: You can increase your happiness by focusing on the things you're grateful for. One way to practice gratitude is to write down three things you are grateful for at the end of each day
  2. Get active: aerobic exercise, also called cardio, is the most effective type of exercise for increasing happiness. Going for a walk or playing tennis is not only good for your physical health, but it also helps lift your mood.
  3. Give yourself a good night's rest: lack of sleep can have a negative impact on your happiness levels. If you're having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, check out these Tips (English language) for a better night's sleep.
  4. Spend lots of time outdoors: Take a walk in the park or get your hands dirty in the garden. Just five minutes of outdoor exercise is enough to significantly improve your mood.
  5. Meditate: meditating regularly can increase your sense of happiness and also bring a number of other benefits, including reducing stress and improving sleep.
  6. Eat healthy: Studies show: The more fruits and vegetables you eat, the happier you'll be. In addition, eating more fruits and vegetables also improves your health in the long run.
  7. Our dietary supplement serotalin😎 (Here go to the Mood Enhancer Test & Compare 2020)

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